Hwëch’in, Tr’ondëk, Klondike

This is the sixty-fourth post in my series that explores the most-used words in the top stories shared amongst Environmental Historians and Environmental Humanities scholars on Twitter each week.   Here are the top articles amongst environmental historians and humanities scholars this past week (May 14 – May 20, 2018): Sunday #Wordcloud!: Said, Water, One https://t.co/Va8SNBFgcb #envhist…

Fund, Will, House

This is the twenty-ninth post in my series that explores the most-used words in the top stories shared amongst Environmental Historians and Environmental Humanities scholars on Twitter each week. Here are the top articles amongst environmental historians and humanities scholars this past week (September 11 – September 17, 2017): The First Book: Advice From Someone Barely…

“Between Stewardship and Exploitation”: A Perspectives Piece

I am happy to announce that the issue of RCC: Perspectives, “Environmental Knowledge, Environmental Politics: Case Studies from Canada and Western Europe,” edited by Jonathan Clapperton and Liza Piper is now out. Many of the articles in this volume are products of the Carson Center and NiCHE sponsored workshop, “Environmentalism from Below,” held at University of…

Visualizing a Park System: Creating an Interactive Timeline

One of the most challenging aspects of my dissertation is figuring out how to analyze the development of four different park systems (Pennsylvania, Idaho, Ontario, and Alberta) over a period of about one hundred years. The sources tend to blur together in my mind, making analysis nearly impossible. I am a visual learner, and about…

Do Not Look Into the Manly Void: Horsbrugh, Pittsburgh, and Point State Park

Sometimes a source just clicks. Sometimes the writer just jumps from the page and one begins to feel like they know the individual personally. This is how I feel about ol’ Patrick Horsbrugh–or Patty, as I like to call him– an architect and urban planner who, in 1963, published the report, Pittsburgh Perceived: A Critical Review of…

Review of Mira Lloyd Dock and the Progressive Era Conservation Movement by Susan Rimby

This review was originally written for H-Net Pennsylvania and can be found here. Susan Rimby.  Mira Lloyd Dock and the Progressive Era Conservation Movement.  University Park  Pennsylvania State University Press, 2012.  Illustrations. xii + 208 pp.  $64.95 (cloth), ISBN 978-0-271-05624-1; $29.95 (paper), ISBN 978-0-271-05625-8. Reviewed by Jessica DeWitt Published on H-Pennsylvania (September, 2014) Commissioned by…