Comps Notes: Kopas’ Taking the Air

I decided to publish my write-ups from my comprehensive exam reading fields. I am publishing them *as is.* Thus they represent my thoughts as a new PhD student. They were written between September 2011 and July 2012. The full collection is accessible here.  Taking the Air: Ideas and Change in Canada’s National Parks Paul Kopas Paul Kopas is a…

Lowry’s The Capacity for Wonder

I decided to publish my write-ups from my comprehensive exam reading fields. I am publishing them *as is.* Thus they represent my thoughts as a new PhD student. They were written between September 2011 and July 2012. The full collection is accessible here.  The Capacity for Wonder: Preserving National Parks William R. Lowry William R. Lowry…

Comps Notes: Bella’s Parks for Profit

I decided to publish my write-ups from my comprehensive exam reading fields. I am publishing them *as is.* Thus they represent my thoughts as a new PhD student. They were written between September 2011 and July 2012. The full collection is accessible here.  Leslie Bella is a professor in the School of Social Work at Memorial…

Comps Notes: Hermer’s Regulating Eden

I decided to publish my write-ups from my comprehensive exam reading fields. I am publishing them *as is.* Thus they represent my thoughts as a new PhD student. They were written between September 2011 and July 2012. The full collection is accessible here.  Joe Hermer is an Associate Professor of Law and Criminology in the Sociology Department at…

Hwëch’in, Tr’ondëk, Klondike

This is the sixty-fourth post in my series that explores the most-used words in the top stories shared amongst Environmental Historians and Environmental Humanities scholars on Twitter each week.   Here are the top articles amongst environmental historians and humanities scholars this past week (May 14 – May 20, 2018): Sunday #Wordcloud!: Said, Water, One https://t.co/Va8SNBFgcb #envhist…

Environmental, Said, B.C

This is the forty-ninth post in my series that explores the most-used words in the top stories shared amongst Environmental Historians and Environmental Humanities scholars on Twitter each week. Here are the top articles amongst environmental historians and humanities scholars this past week (January 29– February 4, 2018): Scientists Identify Third-Largest Eruption in Earth’s History https://t.co/fnOPqFepBQ pic.twitter.com/cYOU8nSPPJ…

Race Relations in Early Park Films

Several months ago I wrote a short blog post about the objectification of women in early park films. In addition to gender issues, many park videos also illuminate mid-century race relations in North America. One of the most blaring statements on race relations within many of these films available on YouTube and elsewhere is the…

“One Crop that Never Fails”: Objectification in Early Park Videos

Culturally, we like to celebrate parks. We like to hold them up as bastions of altruistic preservation and outdoor democratization. Right now we are even holding up national parks as leaders of the capital “R”#Resistance. Parks are complicated, though. Parks are not innocuous. It is difficult to bring up the problems with parks at a time…

“What will come of it?”: Selwyn Dewdney Questions Algonquin

The oft neglected introduction, so regularly skipped by the average reader…I presume, most historians will tell you that the introduction is one of the most, if not the most, important parts of the book. The most interesting iteration of the introduction, and the most tempting to gloss over, is the introduction written by another author…

From Shippensburg to Powell and Points in Between

As I’ve climbed deeper into the depths of discipline of history, I’ve found the way that I view the world, particularly whilst travelling, has changed substantially. I’m constantly accessing the background of what lies before me, not just the surface-level imagery presented to me. In the past, I’ve often wanted to write about my travels…